The U.S. Senate voted yesterday to restore Net Neutrality, with a poll outcome of 52-47 in favor of repealing the FCC’s “Restoring Internet Freedom” order last enacted in December 2017.

The vote in favor included forty-seven Democratic senators, three Republican Senators and two independents.

The decision as to wether or not Net Neutrality will be reinstated will now be passed over to the House of Represetatives, where it’s expected to go no further than the Republican-Majority house.

Net Neutraility in the US has been an ongoing debate since it began last fall during the Republican-controlled FCC last fall and has been becoming increasingly heated since then. Last December the repeal of rules eventually arrived and were released to the public, if the new efforts to sidestep to restore the original rules fail, Net Neutraility rules and regulations will be officials ended in the U.S as of June 11 2018.

Restoring the Net Neutrality previously stated in 2015 would mean that rather than being referred to as ‘Internet Service Providers’, ISPs would be classified as ‘Information Service Providers’ to comply with Net Neutraility rules before the 2015 Net Neutraility Advent.

While restoring Net Neutrality may be a good thing in most people’s opinions, many fear that ISPs would be able to reduce internet speeds or block access to any website or service which could be considered as a competitor in their field of interest.